Finals from Dilip Niroj
New Finals from Dilip

Nepal's Day of the Dog -2018

 I arrived in Kathmandu on Nepal's famous Day of the Dog, or Kukur Tihar, the second day of a five-day holiday.    

Day of the Dog in Nepal
White Nepali dog on the Day of the Dog

This handsome boy greeted us on the welcome mat of our guest house and wagged his tail.   He was treated with food and a lovely marigold mala and a bright red tika.

 

Nepali Dog on the Day of the Dog in Nepal
Nepali dog on the Day of the Dog

Another happy dog wanting to get into his gate.

Nepali dog with marigold malla and tika on Nepal's Day of the Dog
Nepali dog with Malla and Tika

This guy has a red tika (blessing) on his forehead that goes well with his shaggy hair.

White Nepali dog on Nepal's Day of the Dog.

Downward dog on his special day!

 

Nepalese dog on the Day of the Dog in Nepal
A Nepali dog on his colorful doorstep.

 

This photo was taken a couple of days later.  The doorstep is decorated for Laxmi Puja, or the Festival of Lights.

In Hindu mythology, a dog also known as Shvan is regarded as the or vehicle of Bhairava, an avatar of Lord Shiva. 

The God of Death also has two watchdogs, who guards the gates of hell.  

Hindus believe that dogs can sense forthcoming danger, most importantly death and are specially worshiped on this day. 

In the Mahabharata, at the end of the epic, a dog follows them on their journey. While on the journey the eldest son of King Pandu and Queen Kunti and the leader of the Pandavas, lost his brothers and wife, however, the dog continued to follow him till the gates of the heaven. It is mentioned in the religious scriptures that the king refused to enter heaven without the dog. 

To see previous Day of the Dog posts, please go to this link.

Folk art portrait of a German Shepherd hand painted on metal in Nepal

Yoda by Baba, Sagar and Jit Gurung. (clockwise from top left)

Yoda's owner chose Baba's, but the others are great, too.   There is a true folk art quality to Jit's portrait of Yoda and Sagar's painting is a classic example of a Nepali Beware of Dog sign that features a German shepherd dog.

This is what you can expect when you honor your dog (or cat) with a Nepal Art Dog portrait.  The time to order is now.   No obligation to buy, but I bet you will not be able to resist!  You will receive your choice of portrait in time for the holidays.

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If you would like to have your dog (cat, horse, chicken , bunny, etc.) immortalized on metal here in Nepal, now is the perfect time to order.   I am here in November, 2018, to order more Danger Dogs and Cats.

This hand-painted art form is fast disappearing in Kathmandu, as it already has in most parts of the world.   I pay fair trade wages, the artists get to paint again, pet lovers get a choice of three paintings for each commission, and I get to help Nepali artists make a living.   Everybody is happy.   Rescue dogs from America get to rescue artists from Nepal!

Now is the time to order:   Be ahead of the Pack!   Orders now accepted for the Fall 2012 trip.

HOW TO ORDER

To order, please send me a photo of your pet.   I will give it to three different artists, giving you a choice of 3 paintings and three artists will get work.   Each painting is about one square foot and is on metal with synthetic enamel paint.   These can be hung indoors or out, be framed or unframed.

While I am in Nepal, your pet will be featured on the Danger Dog Blog, as I stop into the artists' studios and document the works in progress.

Satisfaction is guaranteed as I accept no money up front.   If you do not like one of the three, you pay nothing, and the 3 artists are paid in full in any case.   Let me know what you want it to say and that's it!

Send your photo to ampage1@gmail.com or find out more at www.NepalDog.com.

Let's keep these artists painting.

American Dogs = Nepali Jobs.

Hello from Dogmandu!

Please check out the Nepal Dog YouTube Channel:   https://www.youtube.com/user/NepalDog

You will be happy you did!

Micro-finance through art patronage.    Trade not Aid.


 

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